Best eq for effects loop

Having a large number of effects can be a double edged sword, allowing for more sonic flavors at the cost of more time spent in tweaking your settings. Thankfully, Vox was able to design an intuitive set of controls that will fit the small surface area of the pedal, even players with little to no experience with effects will find the StompLab IIG to be a breeze to use. Although some would complain about the sound quality, many of the pedal's presets, especially the Vox style clean, crunch and mid-gain tones would easily surpass your expectations.

Compact does not alway mean stripped down, at least not with the feature packed Vox Lil' Looper. This compact two footswitch footswitch pedal has most of the features found on bigger loopers while retaining a temptingly affordable price tag. Having two independent loops was impressive enough for a pedal this size, but it did not stop with just that, Vox was able to stuff it with essential features like record, playback, overdub and even quantize. This makes the Lil' Looper viable for performances, without the bulk and the extra cost.

One other cool thing about this--you can program LFOs to smoothly modulate parameters for you in realtime! So if you want a "stereo tape delay" sound, you can start with the Dual Echo algorithm, apply some of the hi- and lo-cut (already built in to the algorithm), and then insert a Chorus (dialed in as a vibrato) into the feedback loop, with an LFO programmed to modulate the rate and depth parameters of the vibrato, for a more random "wow & flutter" effect. Every delay can be synced to tap tempo as well, and it has more rhythmic subdivisions available on here than pretty much any other delay I've ever seen, so you can get a lot of interesting patterns going with the cross-feedback and the two delays (multi-head tape echo would be a cinch!).

Quilter MicroPro 200 amplifiers work well with effects pedals and external effects units. To get the best results, we classify two groups of effect types where one group should be placed in front of the amp's input and the others placed in the effects loop.

Pre-input
Distortion, overdrive, boost and fuzz pedals should be placed between the guitar and amplifier input to get the best results. You can experiment with the output level of the pedal to see how it effects the amp's gain structure and overdrive characteristics. More level from the pedal is equivalent to turning up the amp's gain control. In this way, you can balance between the pedal's overdrive tone and the amp's overdrive tone.

Using overdrive/distortion pedals also allows you to utilize the amp's wide-range active EQ to alter the tone of the overdrive. This creates a different effect than the amp's internal overdrive section which comes after the EQ. Also try an EQ pedal before your distortion and use the amp's EQ after distortion to get tones that are very difficult to achieve within the amp alone. Compressors and wah-wahs also work best in front of the amp's input.

Effects Loop
All modulation and time-based effects (chorus, flanger, phaser, tremolo, vibrato, pitch shifters, ring modulator, reverb, delay, echo, and looper) are best used in the effects loop. The amp's effects loop is after the preamp in the signal chain. If you want to utilize any stereo effects, this is the best place for them (refer to a previous FAQ for more details). You can use the foot controller to switch the entire effects loop in or out. It is not recommended to use high gain effects like overdrives in the effects loop because this may amplify noise in an undersireable way.

Volume pedals, noise gates and equalizers are suitable for either location and their effect on tone will be a little different when used each way.

With a pre-wired pedal board, it may be more convienent to have the whole board go into the amp's input and don't use the effects loop at all. There is nothing wrong with this approach but it does sound a little different.

If you use a lot of effects, it can be an eye-opener to experiment using none or just a few pedals straight into the amp. As your guitar's signal passes through each pedal in the chain, tone can be slightly degraded along the way.

Best eq for effects loop

best eq for effects loop

Quilter MicroPro 200 amplifiers work well with effects pedals and external effects units. To get the best results, we classify two groups of effect types where one group should be placed in front of the amp's input and the others placed in the effects loop.

Pre-input
Distortion, overdrive, boost and fuzz pedals should be placed between the guitar and amplifier input to get the best results. You can experiment with the output level of the pedal to see how it effects the amp's gain structure and overdrive characteristics. More level from the pedal is equivalent to turning up the amp's gain control. In this way, you can balance between the pedal's overdrive tone and the amp's overdrive tone.

Using overdrive/distortion pedals also allows you to utilize the amp's wide-range active EQ to alter the tone of the overdrive. This creates a different effect than the amp's internal overdrive section which comes after the EQ. Also try an EQ pedal before your distortion and use the amp's EQ after distortion to get tones that are very difficult to achieve within the amp alone. Compressors and wah-wahs also work best in front of the amp's input.

Effects Loop
All modulation and time-based effects (chorus, flanger, phaser, tremolo, vibrato, pitch shifters, ring modulator, reverb, delay, echo, and looper) are best used in the effects loop. The amp's effects loop is after the preamp in the signal chain. If you want to utilize any stereo effects, this is the best place for them (refer to a previous FAQ for more details). You can use the foot controller to switch the entire effects loop in or out. It is not recommended to use high gain effects like overdrives in the effects loop because this may amplify noise in an undersireable way.

Volume pedals, noise gates and equalizers are suitable for either location and their effect on tone will be a little different when used each way.

With a pre-wired pedal board, it may be more convienent to have the whole board go into the amp's input and don't use the effects loop at all. There is nothing wrong with this approach but it does sound a little different.

If you use a lot of effects, it can be an eye-opener to experiment using none or just a few pedals straight into the amp. As your guitar's signal passes through each pedal in the chain, tone can be slightly degraded along the way.

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